Stakeholders meet for 3 days in Kigali for Scenario-guided Review and Regional Policy harmonization workshop

Kigali, Wednesday, 17th August 2016. The stakeholders in the East African Countries are meeting for a three days (17-19 August 2016) workshop in Kigali at Grand Legacy Hotel in a bid to engaging stakeholders in using future scenarios to analyse the potential impacts of agricultural development in the Lake Victoria Basin and promote regional policy

Kigali, Wednesday, 17th August 2016. The stakeholders in the East African Countries are meeting for a three days (17-19 August 2016) workshop in Kigali at Grand Legacy Hotel in a bid to engaging stakeholders in using future scenarios to analyse the potential impacts of agricultural development in the Lake Victoria Basin and promote regional policy harmonization to be able to address cross-boundary issues in more adequate way. This workshop is co-convened by United Nations Environmental Programme - World Conservation Monitoring Centre, the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security and the Albertine Rift Conservation Society.

Opening the workshop, Dr. Sam Kanyamibwa, the Executive Director of the Albertine Rift Conservation Society, stressed the integral role of strong collaboration in tackling the complex issues like climate change and food security. He said: “Collaboration and participatory approach are key to finding solutions for future food security needs in this changing climate and other drivers such as rapid growing population.” “I thank you for being part of this since the beginning and I think throughout three days of scenario-review on policies will come up with good recommendations that could guide decisions in the region”, he added.

Nowadays, the world is trying to overcome the most challenging issue with its rapid growing population- achieve sustainable food security in a changing climate. More food is needed in the future but climate change means less food production potential and poor people will be hit the hardest. Climate-related crop failures, fishery collapses and livestock deaths already cause economic losses and undermine food security, and these are likely to become more severe as global warming continues. If we are to achieve this goal, we need to look at multiple directions of drivers of change. This can only be effective if scientists, researchers, policy makers, civil society, and those who depend on agriculture for their livelihoods sit together and analyse the scenarios for an effective decision making. It is in that context that, with funding support from MacArthur Foundation, the United Nations Environmental Programme - World Conservation Monitoring Centre, the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security and the Albertine Rift Conservation Society bring together different actors in agricultural science, climate science, environmental and social sciences to identify and address the most important interactions, synergies and trade-offs between climate change and agriculture in Lake Victoria Basin. The participants will analyse the policies and plan in the countries of the region and draw recommendation to guide the future review of the later.

This workshop is expected to provide scenario-guided recommendations to the future development policy, plan and investments in the countries sharing the Lake Victoria Basin.

Note for editor:

About Scenarios: Scenarios are ‘what if’ stories about the future, told in words, numbers (models), images and other means. Rather than attempting to forecast a single future in the face of broad future uncertainty, scenarios represent multiple plausible directions that future drivers of change can take. For this workshop, we will focus on drivers of change for agriculture and food security – climate change and socio-economic changes.

Find some photos for the event here

For more information, contact:

Gilbert Muvunankiko, Information Systems and Communications Manager, The Albertine Rift Conservation Society, Email: [email protected], Phone: +250788563293